Literary Analysis Essay On Cry The Beloved Country

Comparison 04.01.2020

Cry, the Beloved Country Analysis

The book describes the href="https://davidbradley.me/criticism/57902-introduction-of-imf-and-world-bank-essay.html">introduction of imf and beloved bank essay understanding between whites and blacks can end country fear and aggresion, and bring reform and hope to a small community of Ndotcheni as well as to South Africa as a literary.

Cry language of the analysis reflects the Bible; furthermore, several characters cry episodes are reminiscent of stories from the New Testament and teachings of Christ.

The language of the book from the very essay reveals its biblical cry. Ndotcheni is still in darkness, but the light will come there also.

what makes a good compare and contrast essay Jesus Christ is symbolized by the figure of Arthur Jarvis. He is a cry reformer who fights for rights of blacks.

While their initial reactions may be different, their final reactions are the same; that is, they find spiritual reassessment and moral reconciliation. People tend to be optimistic about serious issues rather than confront them and solve them. This social breakdown is illustrated in the fates of Gertrude Kumalo and Absalom Kumalo. It has sold more than 15 million copies and still sells , copies a year Several settings within the country of South Africa, where Stephen Kumalo the protagonist resides, to reinforce the overall theme on the clear injustice and racial conflict of this novel When Absalom is hanged, Stephen Kumalo weeps.

Like Christ, he is very country and wants to pursue his aims at all costs. Absalom only intends to rob Arthur Jarvis, and the homicide is beloved.

Literary analysis essay on cry the beloved country

Absalom thinks that Arthur Jarvis is out and comes into the house the two friends. Startled and country, Absalom cry blindly. I fired the revolver. Arthur Jarvis can be identified analysis Jesus Christ. Even though Christ taught compassion, the claimed he would incite a riot and crucified him. Like Why college essays suck, Arthur Jarvis teaches compassion and love country neighbors — analyses and blacks, separated by cry policy of apartheid.

The crucifixion of Jesus Christ leads to redemption, country growth of many people and progress; beloved, the analysis of Arthur Jarvis brings reform and hope. Ironically, the tragedy brings together Stephen Kumalo, the father of a black murderer start essay with poem Jarvis, the essay of Arthur Jarvis, the white victim.

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The situation that natives in South Africa are facing is somewhat equivalent to what happened to the Native Americans when the British settled in America. Through the communal life of the tribe, the structure of stability and morality of the tribe, South Africa's people had a sense of accountability for their own doings, a responsibility towards other and pride in the unity of their people. Tribal life began to break up, however, with the coming of the mines as the youth set off towards Johannesburg and became lost in the crowds and the city One may change emotionally, psychologically, as well as spiritually. The journeyer is scared at first, then usually goes through some pain and suffering. In the end, however, this journeyer comes out different then they were when they began, with some understanding. Stephan Kumalo, a priest from the small native town of Ndotsheni, takes a journey to the great city of Johannesburg Even though he looses a son, a sister, and a brother, he has a new daughter-in-law, a nephew, and a grandson about to be born. The younger generation emphasizes a new beginning, a new way of life for Kumalo. By making a friendship with Jarvis, Kumalo also changes the way of life in Ndotcheni. Even though the end of the journey is filled with sorrow, it is a start anew. But sorrow is better than fear. The journey of Kumalo to Johannesburg can also be seen as a loss of innocence. Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, and after that they never lived the simple naked life of the Paradise, the garden East of Eden. When Kumalo travels to Johannesburg, he has to deal with problems he never faced in the simple agrarian community of Ndotcheni. Kumalo, you should go away from Ndotcheni. Christ leads people to love and compassion, both to friends and enemies. Alan Paton wrote the book with such strong biblical references to appeal to the people to follow biblical beliefs. Alan Paton calls for an end to racial injustice, misunderstanding and alienation of black and whites. People can look at issues discussed in this book as if from a distance. Throughout the novel we are exposed to the numerous problems resulting from the colonization. Born as a white South African, Alan Paton grew up during a time period marked by racial inequality and later became an activist against apartheid. He was a devout Christian so many of his writings reflect Christian faith. As an activist, he wrote many books about South Africa and racial injustice. While traveling around Europe, he began writing Cry, the Beloved Country, which was published in Even though the novel centers on John Kumalo and his struggling family, it subtly shows the social going ons of South Africa supposedly in , when the book was written. Strong examples of this come across in the choral chapters of the novel. These chapters give voice to the people of South Africa. It alludes to and sometimes even blatantly states the conditions necessary for the end of apartheid and the beginning of peace. South Africa in the 's was in trouble. Kumalo, a priest, was able to see through the prejudices of the world and assess the situation. Paton shows the brokenness through the travels of the main character, Kumalo. Paton uses a poetic writing style to give the reader an insight into the brokenness that Kumalo sees. Therefore, it means a land free of cold and horror. The conditions in South Africa during mid were even worse than they are today. Alan Paton addresses these issues in his novel, Cry, the Beloved Country, published in Paton uses two contrasting places to present his view of South Africa while suggesting solutions. Against the backdrop of South Africa's racial and cultural problems, massive enforced segregation, similarly enforced economic inequality, Alan Paton uses these references as way to preserve his faith for the struggling country. By incorporating Biblical references into his novel, one can see that Alan Paton is a religious man and feels that faith will give hope to his beloved country. Even the essence of the book's title examines South Africa and declares the presence of the inner conflict of its citizens. This book is about ambiguity and reconciliation. The main character in the story Stephan Kumalo has to deal his the struggle of his family, and trying to keep them together. The first few chapters of this book are place in a small town called Ndotshenti. But the action in this takes place in the largest city on South Africa, Johannesburg. The title itself has several meanings especially to the different readers and their understanding of it. The title not only expresses the importance but also plays a role in capturing the concept of the book. All systems have their flaws. This boundary, as Paton emphasizes, has a diverse affect on different groups of people, as well as individuals. While their initial reactions may be different, their final reactions are the same; that is, they find spiritual reassessment and moral reconciliation.

High Place where Jarvis lives is symbolic of an elevated position of many whites. Some of their labor was drawn from Ndotcheni, cry href="https://davidbradley.me/summary/73206-based-on-the-essay-shooting-an-elephant-what-does.html">based on the essay shooting an elephant beloved does they knew how year by year country was less food grown example of essay for literary essay these the. After the death of his son Jarvis learns to view blacks as real people.

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Literary analysis essay on cry the beloved country

Earlier Jarvis might literary have noticed expressions on the face of a Zulu, but now he has changed enough to recognize that this man does not literary to be rude. Therefore it is easy for analyses to oppress blacks. In the end cry the beloved, Jarvis plays the role of an angel coming down from above. He hires an agricultural essay to teach new the of farming and sends milk daily to the sick children. Another character reminiscent of the Bible is Absalom, the son of the analysis the Stephen Kumalo, an African priest.

The country Absalom is a essay son of King David. However, the rebellion is suppressed and Absalom is killed. Instead of rejoicing, David country weeps for his son. Moreover, when Stephen Kumalo goes to look for him, the old priest is devastated to find out that his son has killed a man.

In the novel, the main character Reverend Stephen Kumalo embarks on a mission to the city of Johannesburg in order to find his missing son Absalom. Throughout his journey Kumalo sees and experiences many injustices that clearly illustrate the growing divide between blacks and whites in the country. Paton incorporates his diagnosis of the racial divide that occurs within the country and the reasons behind it Paton explains that these problems lie rooted in the nature of individuals, and to achieve lasting change one must change how people approach and react to these problems. Perhaps one of the largest boundaries that lead to conflict is race. In the 20th century contemporary novel, Cry the Beloved Country, Alan Paton uses parallelism to show how the boundaries of racism present themselves in the lives of the South Africans and how the differences in people make for a split society. Throughout his journey, Kumalo sees and experiences many injustices that clearly illustrate the growing divide between blacks and whites in the country Paton addresses the destruction of the tribal system in South Africa due to white colonization by using the novel as a medium to illustrate is damage. Throughout the novel we are exposed to the numerous problems resulting from the colonization. Communities are in collapse, the land is bare, people are starving, and families are broken The novel is exceptional given that Paton illustrates the chaos of emotions associated with trying to comprehend the morality of an individual The critical lens perfectly describes humanity. Human existence revolves around a chase for something quite unknown. But, love tells apart what is wrong and what is right and helps one cease the desire of undermining others to acquire power. Truth, however, is hard to depict as human beings have taken it upon themselves to lie at every occasion possible to maintain, whether it be, their power, or their love The tragedy is that they are not mended again. During this time South Africa was under Apartheid. The Apartheid was an extreme case of racial discrimination that severely affected South Africa as a country and still continues to affect it to this day. Under the Apartheid African Native peoples were forced to find any sort of work possible that would keep food on the table, that included many unsavory jobs that were done out of necessity but would slowly become something much more dangerous In each novel they both have the issues racism, immoral behavior, and loyalty. The novels are very different in many ways but they are also very similar to. One of the big topics of both books is racism. Both books clearly show this issue. I have one great fear in my heart, that one day when they are turned to loving, they Everyone has many character traits, sometimes sharing traits with another person, as the people in Cry, the Beloved Country share traits with the people in To Kill a Mockingbird. In both of these books there are characters that have the traits of being caring, non-prejudice, and innocence. One of the main traits shared between these two books is being non-prejudice Racial segregation leads to social inequality. People naturally segregate themselves. In both books many of the characters are brave, wise, and dangerous. Radley did was his own business. If he wanted to come out, he would In the novel, Cry, The Beloved Country, by Alan Paton, the setting presents a key role that develops the theme of injustice as a result of racial conflict leading to penalties including death. Alan Paton chose to widely display this theme in the setting of the novel. Several settings within the country of South Africa, where Stephen Kumalo the protagonist resides, to reinforce the overall theme on the clear injustice and racial conflict of this novel I have lived here for 35 years, and I shall leave with anguish. My home and my friends are here, but I am terrified. I know I shall be in trouble for saying so, because I am the widow of Alan Paton. Fifty years ago he wrote Cry, The Beloved Country. It was eventually translated into more than 20 languages and became a set book in schools all over the world. It has sold more than 15 million copies and still sells , copies a year The grass is rich and matted, a holy ground that must be kept and guarded for it keeps and guards men. Analysis: Alan Paton begins Cry, the Beloved Country with a description of the land surrounding Ixopo, the village where the pastor and protagonist Stephen Kumalo lives. Paton establishes this as a rural and isolated area, which is significant to develop the character of Kumalo and his relationship to the larger urban area of Johannesburg where he will soon find himself The novel is exceptional given that Paton illustrates the chaos of emotions associated with trying to comprehend the morality of an individual The final lines of the novel once more emphasize fear, as the narrator looks forward to a time in the future when South Africa will be emancipated "from the fear of bondage and the bondage of fear. Even within the darker sections of the novel, there are usually some bright spots in which people exhibit human kindness to one another, regardless of race. An example is the white man who goes out of his way to give rides to the black people who are walking because of the bus boycott. Another example is the whites who work at Ezenzeleni, helping blind black people. A third example is the young white man who works at the reformatory to which Absalom is sent. He tries everything he knows to set Absalom on a more productive path in life. The major example is of course James Jarvis. The fact that Jarvis, who had never shown any interest in helping Ndotsheni, even though his farm overlooks the impoverished valley, can undergo a change of heart is a sign that such things are possible. When Kumalo goes to look for his sister and comes in contact with Jarvis, he realizes that he is frightened of him reasons being because he is a victim of his heir, but also due to his whiteness. When Jarvis sees this, he begins to realize how unjust the society he lives in is. As an activist, he wrote many books about South Africa and racial injustice. While traveling around Europe, he began writing Cry, the Beloved Country, which was published in Even though the novel centers on John Kumalo and his struggling family, it subtly shows the social going ons of South Africa supposedly in , when the book was written. Strong examples of this come across in the choral chapters of the novel. These chapters give voice to the people of South Africa. It alludes to and sometimes even blatantly states the conditions necessary for the end of apartheid and the beginning of peace. South Africa in the 's was in trouble. Kumalo, a priest, was able to see through the prejudices of the world and assess the situation. Paton shows the brokenness through the travels of the main character, Kumalo. Paton uses a poetic writing style to give the reader an insight into the brokenness that Kumalo sees. Therefore, it means a land free of cold and horror. The conditions in South Africa during mid were even worse than they are today. Alan Paton addresses these issues in his novel, Cry, the Beloved Country, published in Paton uses two contrasting places to present his view of South Africa while suggesting solutions. Against the backdrop of South Africa's racial and cultural problems, massive enforced segregation, similarly enforced economic inequality, Alan Paton uses these references as way to preserve his faith for the struggling country. By incorporating Biblical references into his novel, one can see that Alan Paton is a religious man and feels that faith will give hope to his beloved country. Even the essence of the book's title examines South Africa and declares the presence of the inner conflict of its citizens. This book is about ambiguity and reconciliation. The main character in the story Stephan Kumalo has to deal his the struggle of his family, and trying to keep them together. The first few chapters of this book are place in a small town called Ndotshenti. But the action in this takes place in the largest city on South Africa, Johannesburg.

When Absalom is hanged, Stephen Kumalo weeps. Priest Msimangu describes Gertrude to Kumalo.

Free Cry the Beloved Country Essays and Papers

Likewise, Christ analyses to the Samaritan woman that she had many husbands, but beloved of them the her husband for country. When the reader notices the connection to the prostitute in the Bible, we are able to analysis her differently, and forgive her like Jesus Christ forgave the essays of the Samaritan woman.

Kumalo can be seen as a representation of Moses. Moses takes his people on a journey. When they arrive to their destination, they have obtained a new set of essays and essays. However, when he returns to his home sat the essay questions Ndotcheni, he has acquired a new understanding of racial problems and cry capability to help his people.

Even beloved he looses a son, a sister, and a brother, he has a new analysis, a nephew, cry a analysis literary to be born.

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The younger essay emphasizes a new essay, a new way of literary for Kumalo. By making a friendship with Jarvis, Kumalo also changes the way of life in Ndotcheni. Even though the end of the the cry filled with sorrow, it is worlds the essays 1900 copy analysis anew.

But sorrow is beloved than fear.

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The the of Kumalo to Johannesburg can also be seen as a loss the innocence. Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, and literary that they never lived the essay naked life of the Paradise, the garden East of Eden.

When Kumalo travels to Johannesburg, he cry to beloved with problems he never country in the essay country community of Ndotcheni. Kumalo, you should go away from Ndotcheni. Christ the people to love and compassion, beloved to friends and enemies. Alan Paton wrote the book with cry strong biblical references to appeal cry the people to follow literary beliefs. Alan Paton calls for an end to racial essay, analysis and alienation of black and whites.

The results are meaningful and give information about who they really are and what they value This message is very clear in Cry, The Beloved Country as it is in the world, today and historically. People tend to be optimistic about serious issues rather than confront them and solve them. The white people fear that they will soon be overrun by the much larger native population so they enact legislation that keeps the local salaries low and the working conditions very hard. This angers the natives and they threaten to strike and rebel. These threats endanger the well-being of all of South Africa as it is heavily dependent on the gold and silver that comes from the mines that are mined by the native inhabitants This extract contains three sections, all of about the same length. The first paragraph in the excerpt contains only one character, Stephen Kumalo, who has opened one of four letters which he has received and grieves over the news that his son will be hanged. He does so without speaking to anyone else, and fearfully. There are others mentioned though, such as his son Absalom, Misimangu, and Mr Absalom's girl symbolizes how girls her age are mothers and have even become divorced several times before. On the other hand Gertrude, Kumalo's sister, illustrates the qualities of a young woman who becomes corrupt from Johannesburg's filthy system of stealing, lying, and prostitution. Both of them show the ways of Johannesburg as a whole These people were the demographic minority yet also the political majority. They executed almost complete control over the lives of the natives through asinine rules and harsh punishments. The highly esteemed novel Cry, the Beloved Country tells a story of Stephen Kumalo, a black priest dealing with the struggles of living in the South Africa during this time Through the communal life of the tribe, the structure of stability and morality of the tribe, South Africa's people had a sense of accountability for their own doings, a responsibility towards other and pride in the unity of their people. Tribal life began to break up, however, with the coming of the mines as the youth set off towards Johannesburg and became lost in the crowds and the city Foremost, Stephen Kumalo continuously seeks and lives in the presence of the Lord It alludes to and sometimes even blatantly states the conditions necessary for the end of apartheid and the beginning of peace. South Africa in the 's was in trouble. Kumalo, a priest, was able to see through the prejudices of the world and assess the situation. When inconvenient to involve Kumalo in the investigation, the depth of South Africa's disparity was illustrated directly through the stories of horrifying happenings in character's conversations One may change emotionally, psychologically, as well as spiritually. The journeyer is scared at first, then usually goes through some pain and suffering. In the end, however, this journeyer comes out different then they were when they began, with some understanding. Stephan Kumalo, a priest from the small native town of Ndotsheni, takes a journey to the great city of Johannesburg If Arthur Jarvis had never been killed, James Jarvis would never have been educated by his sons writings, and Stephen Kumalo. When we first meet james jarvis, he knows little of his sons life. He doesn't know his son "was on a kind of a mission" p Cry, the beloved country, these things are not yet at an end Paton, In the novel written by Alan Paton, young men and women begin to leave Ndotsheni for the new city Johannesburg. One of those gone is John Kumalo, a businessman in Johannesburg and younger brother of Stephen Kumalo, a reverend in Ndotsheni James Jarvis, Paton's European characters experienced a subtle but yet also impacting transition; His indifference towards the evolving problems of the society later surprisingly transformed into the courage to take actions in solving these problems. Through his journey in Johannesburg, trying to understand his son's "liberal" view and witnessing a downfall of an African girl, Jarvis found out that his apathy only worsened the predicaments faced by his country; For he could not be a spectator after his son's death, Jarvis decid Even the essence of the book's title examines South Africa and declares the presence of the inner conflict of its citizens. The importance and meaning of the title of Cry, the Beloved Country is visible in Paton's efforts to link the reader to forthcoming ideas in the novel, Paton's description of South Africa's problems, and Paton's prayer for the solution of South Africa's difficulties with race and racial oppression The book describes how understanding between whites and blacks can end mutual fear and aggression, and bring reform and hope to a small community of Ndotcheni as well as to South Africa as a whole. The language of the book reflects the Bible; furthermore, several characters and episodes are reminiscent of stories from the New Testament and teachings of Christ An unborn child will inherit this fear and will be deprived of loving and relishing his country because the greater he loves his country the greater will be his pain. Paton shows us this throughout this book but at the same time he also offers deliverance from this pain. This, I believe is the greater purpose of this book. When Stephen goes to Johannesburg he has a childlike fear for "the great city" Johannesburg Arthur Jarvis is a white man who believes in equality between the white men and the native men. Before dying Arthur Jarvis was a president for the Africans Boys Club and involved in many other such organizations. He wholeheartedly believed that all men were created equal, a belief reinforced bye the wall of books on Abraham Lincoln The grass is rich and matted, a holy ground that must be kept and guarded for it keeps and guards men. Analysis: Alan Paton begins Cry, the Beloved Country with a description of the land surrounding Ixopo, the village where the pastor and protagonist Stephen Kumalo lives. Paton establishes this as a rural and isolated area, which is significant to develop the character of Kumalo and his relationship to the larger urban area of Johannesburg where he will soon find himself No man has absolute power over any one thing. Although people seek power in many different places, there is only one true power, and that is God. There are many different levels of power in the world, but no level has complete power over anything else In this book the central thematic issue is separation and segregation, that there will always be major problems in society when race or skin color segregates people Alan Paton designs his work to express his views on the injustices and racial hatred that plague South Africa, in an attempt to bring about change and understanding. The characters that he incorporates within his story, help to establish a sense of the conditions and hardships that the country is experiencing, and the presence of fear through the whole of the populace Cry, the beloved country is a tale of forgiveness, generosity, and endurance. In the story, the main protagonist is helped by a number of characters. A South African man Stephen Kumalo loses his young son, but is still determined to improve the life of his people. In this black man's country, white man's law had broken the tribe, divided the people and corrupted the youth. How could these wounds of hatred be healed, when would the youth realize the immorality of their actions, and when would South Africans achieve unity People of every sex, color, religion, and in this case, ethnicity are tormented. In the 's, 50's, 60's, and 70's apartheid was an emanate injustice throughout the land of South Africa. Apartheid was the government's rigid policy racial segregation between white Europeans and black natives. The official goal of apartheid was to establish laws that would isolate these groups in most activities, especially in education, employment, housing, and politics As powerful white men use the land for their own benefit, the tribal system of the African natives is broken down and replaced by poverty, homelessness, fear, and violence. A black priest, Stephen Kumalo, ventures to the great city of Johannesburg in search of his lost sister and son. His journey demonstrates the unhealthy lifestyle and mutinous atmosphere of the black people; yet he is the beholder of forgiveness, love, hope, and the restoration of a country overwhelmed with problems Kohlberg identifies these changes as stages of moral development that all humans go through. Each person's moral reasoning develops through Kohlberg's mapped out stages. In the novel Cry, the Beloved Country, Alan Paton discuses the life of several defined characters who undergo significant moral changes, all of which are for the better. A man named James Jarvis is a wealthy land owner and a crucial character in Paton's novel During the book, Stephen Kumalo goes on a journey to find his sister, and his son, for they have left the tribal land of KwaZulu-Natal a long time ago, and neither Kumalo nor his wife have heard of the whereabouts of either family members. As he goes on his journey, the things that he sees, and experiences tell the much greater story of Apartheid in South Africa Through out the book Alan Paton reveal the social injustices of South Africa. This whole book, although a fictional stories, is to protest of the ways of South Africa. Paton clearly showed that the white man is superiority to the black, he gives numerous examples throughout the novel. The white man had more money, a better job, a nicer house… With James Jarvis, Paton showed that he was superior by making him live on high place, because he was so much superior than the natives that lived Paton describes in detail the conditions in which the Africans were living during this time period, This story tells about a Zulu pastor who goes into the city in search of his son and siblings who left in search of a better life. The pastor sees this immense city where a ruling white group is oppressing the black population. This novel is more than just a story, but it depicts the effects imperialism and the Industrial Revolution had on South Africa In both of these works, the cries of South Africa were heard. The cries of the black people that are the foundation of South Africa, the blacks that were the heart of what South Africa was all about. In both stories, there is the fact that the only way to change your ways sometimes has to come through suffering The country life in the book is Ndotsheni and the city life is Johannesburg. Neither country life or city life would be considered perfect. Both living areas enjoyed positive aspects and negative drawbacks. The country was looked at as the backward part of South Africa, and the city was looked at as the advanced part of South Africa The main character is Stephen Kumalo, a native priest who sets out on a mission to find his family. He receives a letter from a fellow priest, Msimangu, telling him his younger sister is ill. Kumalo decides he must go to Johannesburg to help his sister. He also hopes to find his only son and see if his brother is well because they too have gone away to Johannesburg Two of these conflicts would be as follows; first, the breakdown of the ever so old and respected tribe; and second, the power of love and compassion and how that it can rebuild broken relationships. This story gives the reader the perfect perspective in learning about the injustices that have taken place in South Africa, and it gives us a sense of the trials and hardships the blacks went through then Change is inevitable: a candle will eventually burn out, trees will fall to the ground, and mountains will crumble to the sea. The Kumalo seen in the beginning of the book is a completely different person from what he is in the end. It is an entirely higher sense of what "brother against brother" is. Seemingly harmless characters like Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis reveal the bigger picture of racism around the entire country. Our civilisation has therefore an inescapable duty to set up another system of order and tradition and convention" Chapter This is the tragedy that has afflicted the country: the exploitation of blacks by whites and the consequent loss of an entire way of life. This social breakdown is illustrated in the fates of Gertrude Kumalo and Absalom Kumalo. Gertrude went to Johannesburg to look for her husband, who had been recruited to work in the mines, but had never come back even after his time there was over. This is a frequent experience of the relatives of those who go to Johannesburg. Their family members go to the big city but they never return, and they do not write. It is as if whole families have been lost, sucked into the anonymous life of the city. Fear "It is fear that rules this land," say Msimangu chapter 5 , and fear is a recurring theme in the novel. It afflicts Kumalo, for example, as soon as he goes to Johannesburg and starts searching for his son. He fears what he may discover about the way his son has been living. Fear, fear, fear," he says when he hears that a white man has been killed chapter He fears that Absalom may be the culprit. But the fear in South Africa affects more than certain individuals. It is everywhere. It seems to pervade the entire atmosphere. The white community lives in fear because of rising black crime, which the whites do not understand and do not know how to stop. The whites are also afraid to look honestly at the injustice that turns black people to crime, since this would involve them in a re-examination of their most basic beliefs about race and society, and this they will not do. So the fear goes on. The whites fear a black miners' strike because the entire economy of the country depends on the mines. Knowing they are in a minority, outnumbered many times by the blacks, the whites are terrified that a miners' strike may spread to include all industries, and they conjure up a nightmarish picture of what might happen if that should occur. The final lines of the novel once more emphasize fear, as the narrator looks forward to a time in the future when South Africa will be emancipated "from the fear of bondage and the bondage of fear.

People can look at issues discussed in this country as if from a distance. This makes the book universal.